Pavle Radovanovic


Canada Research Chair in Spectroscopy of Nanoscale Materials

Tier 2 - 2008-01-01
Renewed: 2013-01-01
University of Waterloo
Natural Sciences and Engineering

519-888-4567, ext. 38144
pavler@uwaterloo.ca

Coming to Canada from


Harvard University, USA

Research involves


Using nanomaterials to develop new energy-efficient materials for lighting and information technology.

Research relevance


This research will lead to the development of new energy-efficient materials and devices for information technology and illumination.

Lighting the World with Nanoscale Materials


Declines in the availability of conventional energy sources have made it more important than ever to develop new energy-efficient technologies, materials and devices.

For example, 20 per cent of global electricity consumption is used simply to light residential, office and public buildings. That’s why traditional incandescent light bulbs, which have been the main source of illumination in homes and offices for decades, will soon be replaced by more energy-efficient illumination materials and devices. The growing demand for more powerful hand-held electronic devices is also increasing the need for new and improved electronic materials that are energy-efficient.

Dr. Pavle Radovanovic, Canada Research Chair in Spectroscopy of Nanoscale Materials, is examining how nanomaterials—tiny structures produced by reacting chemicals in solutions or on various surfaces—can be used to produce new energy-efficient materials for lighting and information technology.

Radovanovic is using chemical principles to prepare these materials and a variety of spectroscopic tools to understand their behaviour. Greater understanding and manipulation of the structures and properties of nanomaterials will allow for the design of materials with new functions and improved performance.

Radovanovic’s research will lead to more environmentally-friendly and efficient ways to light our homes and offices and could dramatically change how our current devices operate.