Eundeok Mun



Canada Research Chair in Materials Physics

Tier 2 - 2017-11-01
Simon Fraser University
Natural Sciences and Engineering

778-782-4844
emun@sfu.ca

Coming to Canada From


Los Alamos National Laboratory, United States

Research involves


Discovering and synthesizing novel materials with unusual magnetic and electronic ground states and studying coupling between electricity and magnetism.

Research relevance


This research will contribute to new applications in energy, medicine, sensing, and information and communications technologies.

Synthesizing Quantum Materials


Materials physics—the use of physics to describe the physical properties of materials—shapes our world today: there is no doubt that research in this area has had a major impact on almost every aspect of our lives. Since this field blends chemistry, solid state physics and materials science, it influences everything from education to the economy, energy, the environment and health care. A prime example of where material physics has made a contribution is in the invention of transistors and lasers—and their use in computers as well as in diagnosing and treating diseases.

Dr. Eundeok Mun, Canada Research Chair in Materials Physics, is working to identify novel materials that have unusual physical properties. By designing, synthesizing and characterizing the quantum materials needed for scientific advancement across disciplines, Mun and his research team aim to advance our understanding of new states of matter and complex materials, and to develop a means to control the quantum phases of complex materials.

Developing next-generation devices (such as those used in energy, medical technology and information and communications) requires us to continuously explore new quantum materials—especially those with co-existing electric and magnetic properties. Materials synthesis lays the foundation for all other research in condensed matter physics.

Mun’s research into the growth and characterization of novel quantum materials could have a significant impact on our progress in these areas.