Method of Allocating Chairs


Overview
Regular Allocations
Special Allocations
Reclaiming lost Chairs and deactivation funding mechanism
Chairs toolbox



Overview

The allocation of Chairs to individual universities is an integral part of the Canada Research Chairs program. The process provides an element of dynamism to the program because the allocation is responsive to changes in research success at individual institutions.

The national re-allocation process is conducted every two years, includes both regular and special Chairs, and is based on the research grant funding received by researchers from the three granting agencies – CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC – in the three years prior to the year of the allocation.

Re-allocation process results

Results of the 2014 re-allocation (PDF document, 54 KB)

Results of the 2012 re-allocation (PDF document, 57 KB)

Results of the 2010 re-allocation (PDF document, 17 KB)

Results of the 2008 re-allocation (PDF document, 24 KB)


Regular Allocations

Of the total 2000 Chairs, 1880 are regular allocations, distributed by area of research as follows:

  • 846 Chairs (45 per cent) NSERC
  • 658 Chairs (35 per cent) CIHR
  • 376 Chairs (20 per cent) SSHRC

Method Used to Allocate Regular Chairs

Institutions that have received annually, an average of $100,000 or more from the three federal agencies in the three years prior to the year of the allocation are eligible for regular Chairs.

Three separate calculations are performed for each eligible institution to determine their Chair allocation within the three areas of research. The allocation method for regular Chairs pools together each granting agency's funding for all universities and allocates Chairs based on the portion of the granting agency's funding that each eligible institution has received. The funding received by each eligible university over three years is totalled.  The portion of granting agency support that each eligible institution holds in this grand total determines the number of Chairs allocated (i.e., the percentage of funding secured = the percentage of Chairs allocated).

Chairs are distributed in an alternating order: a Tier 2 is awarded first, followed by a Tier 1, followed by a Tier 2, etc.



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Special Allocations

The program sets aside a special allocation of 120 Chairs for universities that have received one per cent or less of the total funding paid out by the three federal granting agencies over the three years prior to the year of the allocation. This is known as the "1% threshold". Unlike regular allocations, these Chairs are not allocated by granting agency, that is by area of research. Thus, universities can choose the areas in which they would like to use the Chair. Universities may also exchange one Tier 1 Chair for two Tier 2 Chairs, or two Tier 2 Chairs for one Tier 1 Chair, etc.

Note: Some universities will be eligible for both a regular allocation and a special allocation.

Eligibility Requirements for a Special Chair Allocation

To be eligible for a special Chair allocation, institutions must meet all three of the following criteria:

  • They must have received more than an average of $100,000 of grant dollars over the three fiscal years.
  • Their total grant dollars from all three granting agencies must be less than the 1% threshold.
  • They must have received fewer than 11 regular Chairs.

Graduation Mechanism

Universities that have a regular Chair allocation of 11 or more Chairs are not eligible for special Chairs. Starting at eight regular Chairs, as a university gains a regular Chair, they lose a special Chair. This is demonstrated in the table below.

Demonstration of Graduation Mechanism

Regular Chair allocation

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Special Chair allocation

3

3

3

3

2

1

0

0

Total allocation

8

9

10

11

11

11

11

12

Method Used to Allocate Special Chairs

The Chairs program uses a competitive method to allocate special Chairs. The calculation pools the funding provided by all three granting agencies to all universities eligible for special Chairs in the three years prior to the year of the allocation for a grand total. The amount of funding that each institution contributes to this grand total determines the percentage of special Chairs it is allocated (i.e., the percentage of funding secured = the percentage of Chairs allocated).

A maximum of three special Chairs is distributed in an alternating order: a Tier 2 is awarded first, followed by a Tier 1, followed by a Tier 2.

Note: Universities receiving less than $200K in agency funding over the three fiscal years are awarded a single Tier 2 Chair.



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Reclaiming Lost Chairs and Deactivation Funding Mechanism

If an institution's performance decreases relative to other institutions to the extent that the institution's Chair allocation is reduced through the re-allocation process, the Chairs Secretariat will reclaim the lost Chair allocations. The institution can choose, in consultation with the Secretariat, to give back unoccupied Chairs or to use a deactivation funding mechanism using a sliding scale of decreasing support (100–50–0 per cent) on active Chairs.

The duration of the deactivation period itself, as well as the length of time that funding will be applied at 100 per cent and 50 per cent may vary, depending on the Chairs program budget at the time. The level of funding provided for Chairs lost in the 2014 re-allocation is 100 per cent for six months, then 50 per cent for the next six months.

The deactivation following the 2014 re-allocation will commence October 1, 2015. Chairholders will retain their titles until the end of their existing terms.

The mechanisms provided within the Chairs toolbox, as outlined below, may also be used to reclaim lost Chairs.



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Chairs Toolbox

Corridor of Flexibility

The corridor of flexibility provides universities with a set number of "flexible Chairs". This allows universities to change the tier or the research area of a limited number of their allocations.

For instance, a university may choose to change two Tier 2 Chairs into a Tier 1 Chair or change a Tier 1 Chair into two Tier 2 Chairs. They may also change an NSERC Chair to a CIHR Chair, or a CIHR Chair to an SSHRC Chair, etc. When a Chair is reverted to its original tier or research area as allocated in the calculation, the flex move is given back to the university.

The corridor of flexibility can also be used to reclaim Chairs lost within the re-allocation process. For example, a university may change a vacant Tier 1 SSHRC Chair into a Tier 1 NSERC Chair in order to return a Tier 1 NSERC Chair to the Secretariat. As demonstrated in the table below, the number of flexible Chairs a university is provided is proportional to its number of allocated Chairs.

Number of allocated Chairs Maximum number of "flexible Chairs"

1-50

5

51-100

10

101-150

15

151-200

20

201-250

25

251-300

30

When using the corridor of flexibility institutions must abide by the following guidelines:

  1. All flexible moves must be approved by the Secretariat.
  2. Universities are expected to contribute to the program's national distribution of Chairs (45 per cent NSERC, 35 per cent CIHR and 20 per cent SSHRC) by making efforts to bring their allocation of Chairs back to its original distribution. The Secretariat will monitor the national distribution of Chairs to ensure that it stays within an acceptable range.