Seth Dworkin


Canada Research Chair in High Performance Computing for Sustainable Energy

Tier 2 - 2017-11-01
Toronto Metropolitan University
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

(416) 979-5000, ext./poste 7311
seth.dworkin@ryerson.ca

Research involves


Developing novel high-performance computing algorithms to model combustion emissions and sustainable energy alternatives.

Research relevance


This Search will Help to reduce and eventually eliminate greenhouse gas and carbon particle emissions, which are key contributors to climate change and respiratory heath problems.

Clearing the air


Over 90 percent of the world’s power generation and transportation systems are based on combustion and emit air pollution, including black carbon particles known as soot. The increasing concentrations of these particles in the atmosphere are accelerating climate change and leading to rising incidences of health problems like cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Seth Dworkin, Canada Research Chair in High Performance Computing for Sustainable Energy, is working to create more detailed modelling methods to inform effective regulations and product designs for energy producers and vehicle manufacturers to reduce and eventually eliminate emissions created by combustion engines. In order to achieve the level of detail required in these models, Dworkin is applying innovative, high-performance computing techniques.

Within the next four years, emissions regulations will move from limiting the total mass of emissions to separately isolating and limiting the number of small and large soot particles. Therefore, industry now faces the challenge of predicting particle sizes, which is where Dworkin’s research enters the picture.

It will create and validate an algorithm to make these accurate, detail-dependent predictions. This work will also be able to predict soot particle formation resulting from alternative fuels such as biofuels, which are expected to become more prevalent in the coming years.

Dworkin’s work has the potential to be used by designers to create engines that will change Canada’s energy and transportation sectors, meeting the needs of both people and the planet.