Martine Hébert



Canada Research Chair on Interpersonal Traumas and Resilience

Tier 1 - 2015-12-01
Université du Québec à Montréal
Social Sciences and Humanities

514-987-3000, ext./poste 5697
hebert.m@uqam.ca

Research involves


Examining different protective factors that can influence individual, family, social and community plans to reduce the impact of violence on young victims of interpersonal trauma.

Research relevance


This research will promote the implementation of best practices and improve services for children and vulnerable young people in Canada.

Supporting Young Victims of Interpersonal Violence


Interpersonal violence is a major problem in Canada because of its prevalence and consequences. Nearly one in five women and one in 10 men report having been sexually abused in childhood. Sexual victimization in childhood is associated with a range of negative consequences in adulthood, and has a negative impact on victims’ physical and sexual health.

Dr. Martine Hébert, Canada Research Chair in Interpersonal Traumas and Resilience, is interested not only in the impacts of such interpersonal violence, but also in why some children seem adapt positively despite the adversity. Analyzing the factors related to their resilience may offer strategies for intervention.

Hébert and her research team are studying the development and diversity of children and young victims of interpersonal trauma. They are identifying protective factors that can influence individuals, families, societies and communities to reduce the impacts of sexual assault and violence in relationships. This will allow them to develop innovative approaches that can promote optimal development among young victims. Hébert is also implementing effective prevention practices to address interpersonal violence.

Hébert's research will promote a more personalized and responsive approach that considers the diversity of the young victims of interpersonal trauma. Ultimately, her work will contribute to improving services for children and vulnerable young people in Canada.