Program Statistics


Total number of Chair allocations (filled and vacant) 2,000
Number of regular allocations (filled and vacant) 1,880
Number of special allocations (filled and vacant) 120
Number of participating universities 76

 For more information on how the program allocates Chairs to each university, visit Method of Allocating Chairs.


Filled Canada Research Chair Positions as of February 2016

Total number of filled Canada Research Chair positions 1,690
Number of Tier 1 chairholders 791
Number of Tier 2 chairholders 899

Total number of chairholders recruited from outside of Canada

  • Expatriates (includes number recruited from the United States)
  • International recruits (includes number recruited from the United States)

160 (9.4%)

75
85

Number recruited from the United States (expatriate Canadians and international)
85
Number of female chairholders
Tier 1: 149
Tier 2: 339
Total: 488 (29%)
Number of male chairholders

Tier 1: 642
Tier 2: 560
Total: 1,202 (71%)

Statistics by Gender

As of 2016, the Canada Research Chairs Program has decided to publish additional statistics to illustrate the progress made to date, and the work that still needs to be done, on the representation of women among the Canada Research Chairs.

From the figures below, it can be concluded that:

  • for the last 10 years, universities have recruited women for an average of 31 per cent of their available Canada Research Chair positions;
  • the program’s average success rates of both genders are equal, at 91 per cent; and
  • the proportion of active Tier 2 Chairs who are women has increased steadily from 31 per cent in 2011 to 37 per cent in 2015, but the proportion for active Tier 1 Chairs remained constant at 17 per cent, over the same period.

Figure 1: Percentage of new Canada Research Chair nominees in 2000-14 who are women (excludes renewals, includes approved and not approved nominations)

Figure 1: Percentage of new Canada Research Chairs  nominees who are women in 2000-14

Description of figure

Figure 1. Social Science and Humanities doctoral graduates vs. university employment opportunities in Canada 2002-2010

The data graph shows the percentage of new Canada Research Chairs nominees in 2000-14 who are women, includes approved and not approved nominations, but excludes renewals.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2000 and going to 2015.

The y-axis shows the percentages, from zero to 40 per cent, in increments of five.

This graph has three lines:

  • The blue line represents the percentage of new nominees in 2000-03 who are women. Each dot on the line represents a year within this period.
  • The red line represents the percentage of new nominees in 2004-14 who are women. Each dot on the line represents a year within this period.
  • The black line is the linear function calculated over the percentage of new nominees in 2004-14 who are women, which is represented by the red line. The calculated average is 31 per cent.

The percentage of new nominees who are women are reported as follows:

  • Within the period 2000-03: 14 per cent in 2000, 16 per cent in 2001, 19 per cent in 2002, and 25 per cent in 2003.
  • Within the period 2004-14: 28 per cent in 2004, 31 per cent in 2005, 37 per cent in 2006, 30 per cent in 2007, 28 per cent in 2008, 35 per cent in 2009, 32 per cent in 2010, 28 per cent in 2011, 34 per cent in 2012, 31 per cent in 2013, and 29 per cent in 2014.

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13 (includes new and renewal nominations)

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13

Description of figure

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13 (includes new and renewal nominations)

This double bar graph, compares in percentages, the success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees who are women versus nominees who are men in 2000-13, including new and renewal nominations.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2000 and going to 2013. It carries two vertical bars for each year: a red bar that represents the success rate of nominees that are women, and a blue bar that represents the success rate of nominees who are men.

The y-axis shows the percentages from 70 to 100 per cent, in increments of five.

The success rates by year and gender of Canada Research Chair nominees are reported as follows:

  • In 2000: 93 per cent for women, 89 per cent for men.
  • In 2001: 87 per cent for women, 91 per cent for men.
  • In 2002: 88 per cent for women, 89 per cent for men.
  • In 2003: 91 per cent for women, 87 per cent for men.
  • In 2004: 82 per cent for women, 86 per cent for men.
  • In 2005: 89 per cent for women, 91 per cent for men.
  • In 2006: 91 per cent for women, 90 per cent for men.
  • In 2007: 97 per cent for women, 96 per cent for men.
  • In 2008: 90 per cent for women, 93 per cent for men.
  • In 2009: 93 per cent for women, 96 per cent for men.
  • In 2010: 95 per cent for women, 95 per cent for men.
  • In 2011: 97 per cent for women, 90 per cent for men.
  • In 2012: 90 per cent for women, 92 per cent for men.
  • In 2013: 84 per cent for women, 87 per cent for men.

The calculated average success rate for both genders is 91 per cent.

Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 (T1) Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 (T1) Canada Research Chairs by gender in 2011-15

Description of figure

Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs by gender in, 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

This stacked bar graph describes the number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15. Numbers are recorded as of March 31 each year.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2011 and going to 2015. It carries vertical bars that are two colours: blue on the top, representing the percentage of active Tier 1 Chairs that are men; and red on the bottom, representing the percentage of active Tier 1 Chairs that are women.

The y-axis shows the number of active Tier 1 Chairs, from zero to 900, in increments of 100.

The number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, and year are reported as follows:

  • In 2011: 652 men (83 per cent), 129 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2012: 671 men (83 per cent), 141 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2013: 668 men (83 per cent), 136 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2014: 677 men (84 per cent), 128 women (16 per cent).
  • In 2015: 663 men (83 per cent), 140 women (17 per cent).

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 (T2) Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 (T2) Canada Research Chairs by gender in 2011-15

Description of figure

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

This stacked bar graph describes the number and percentage of active Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15. Numbers are recorded as of March 31 each year.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2011 and going to 2015. It carries vertical bars that are two colours: blue on the top, representing the percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs that are men; and red on the bottom, representing the percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs that are women.

The y-axis shows the number of active Tier 2 Chairs, from zero to 1,200, in increments of 200.

The number and percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs, by gender and year, were reported as follows:

  • In 2011: 697 men (69 per cent), 318 women (31 per cent).
  • In 2012: 680 men (68 per cent), 327 women (32 per cent).
  • In 2013: 636 men (66 per cent), 327 women (34 per cent).
  • In 2014: 576 men (64 per cent), 327 women (36 per cent).
  • In 2015: 548 men (63 per cent), 325 women (37 per cent).