Program Statistics




Overview


Total number of Chair allocations (filled and vacant) 2,000
Number of regular allocations (filled and vacant) 1,880
Number of special allocations (filled and vacant) 120
Number of participating universities 76

For more information on how the program allocates Chairs to each university, visit Method of Allocating Chairs.



Filled Canada Research Chair Positions

Data as of December 2016

Total number of filled Canada Research Chair positions 1,612
Number of Tier 1 chairholders 772
Number of Tier 2 chairholders 840

Total number of chairholders recruited from outside of Canada

  • Expatriates (includes number recruited from the United States)
  • International recruits (includes number recruited from the United States)

136 (8.4%)

63
73

Number recruited from the United States (expatriate Canadians and international)
74
Number of female chairholders
Tier 1: 153
Tier 2: 328
Total: 481 (30%)
Number of male chairholders

Tier 1: 619
Tier 2: 512
Total: 1,131 (70%)



Statistics by Gender


As of 2016, the Canada Research Chairs Program has decided to publish additional statistics to illustrate the progress made to date, and the work that still needs to be done, on the representation of women among the Canada Research Chairs.

From the figures below, it can be concluded that:

  • for the last 10 years, universities have recruited women for an average of 31 per cent of their available Canada Research Chair positions;
  • the program’s average success rates of both genders are equal, at 91 per cent; and
  • the proportion of active Tier 2 Chairs who are women has increased steadily from 31 per cent in 2011 to 37 per cent in 2015, but the proportion for active Tier 1 Chairs remained constant at 17 per cent, over the same period.

Figure 1: Percentage of new Canada Research Chair nominees in 2000-14 who are women (excludes renewals, includes approved and not approved nominations)

Figure 1: Percentage of new Canada Research Chairs  nominees who are women in 2000-14

Description of figure

Figure 1: Percentage of new Canada Research Chair nominees in 2000-14 who are women (excludes renewals, includes approved and not approved nominations)

The data graph shows the percentage of new Canada Research Chairs nominees in 2000-14 who are women, includes approved and not approved nominations, but excludes renewals.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2000 and going to 2015.

The y-axis shows the percentages, from zero to 40 per cent, in increments of five.

This graph has three lines:

  • The blue line represents the percentage of new nominees in 2000-03 who are women. Each dot on the line represents a year within this period.
  • The red line represents the percentage of new nominees in 2004-14 who are women. Each dot on the line represents a year within this period.
  • The black line is the linear function calculated over the percentage of new nominees in 2004-14 who are women, which is represented by the red line. The calculated average is 31 per cent.

The percentage of new nominees who are women are reported as follows:

  • Within the period 2000-03: 14 per cent in 2000, 16 per cent in 2001, 19 per cent in 2002, and 25 per cent in 2003.
  • Within the period 2004-14: 28 per cent in 2004, 31 per cent in 2005, 37 per cent in 2006, 30 per cent in 2007, 28 per cent in 2008, 35 per cent in 2009, 32 per cent in 2010, 28 per cent in 2011, 34 per cent in 2012, 31 per cent in 2013, and 29 per cent in 2014.

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13 (includes new and renewal nominations)

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13

Description of figure

Figure 2: Success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees by gender in 2000-13 (includes new and renewal nominations)

This double bar graph, compares in percentages, the success rates of Canada Research Chair nominees who are women versus nominees who are men in 2000-13, including new and renewal nominations.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2000 and going to 2013. It carries two vertical bars for each year: a red bar that represents the success rate of nominees that are women, and a blue bar that represents the success rate of nominees who are men.

The y-axis shows the percentages from 70 to 100 per cent, in increments of five.

The success rates by year and gender of Canada Research Chair nominees are reported as follows:

  • In 2000: 93 per cent for women, 89 per cent for men.
  • In 2001: 87 per cent for women, 91 per cent for men.
  • In 2002: 88 per cent for women, 89 per cent for men.
  • In 2003: 91 per cent for women, 87 per cent for men.
  • In 2004: 82 per cent for women, 86 per cent for men.
  • In 2005: 89 per cent for women, 91 per cent for men.
  • In 2006: 91 per cent for women, 90 per cent for men.
  • In 2007: 97 per cent for women, 96 per cent for men.
  • In 2008: 90 per cent for women, 93 per cent for men.
  • In 2009: 93 per cent for women, 96 per cent for men.
  • In 2010: 95 per cent for women, 95 per cent for men.
  • In 2011: 97 per cent for women, 90 per cent for men.
  • In 2012: 90 per cent for women, 92 per cent for men.
  • In 2013: 84 per cent for women, 87 per cent for men.

The calculated average success rate for both genders is 91 per cent.


Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 (T1) Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 (T1) Canada Research Chairs by gender in 2011-15

Description of figure

Figure 3a: The number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs by gender in, 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

This stacked bar graph describes the number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15. Numbers are recorded as of March 31 each year.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2011 and going to 2015. It carries vertical bars that are two colours: blue on the top, representing the percentage of active Tier 1 Chairs that are men; and red on the bottom, representing the percentage of active Tier 1 Chairs that are women.

The y-axis shows the number of active Tier 1 Chairs, from zero to 900, in increments of 100.

The number and percentage of active Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, and year are reported as follows:

  • In 2011: 652 men (83 per cent), 129 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2012: 671 men (83 per cent), 141 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2013: 668 men (83 per cent), 136 women (17 per cent).
  • In 2014: 677 men (84 per cent), 128 women (16 per cent).
  • In 2015: 663 men (83 per cent), 140 women (17 per cent).

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 (T2) Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 (T2) Canada Research Chairs by gender in 2011-15

Description of figure

Figure 3b: The number and percentage of active Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15 (as of March 31 each year)

This stacked bar graph describes the number and percentage of active Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs, by gender, in 2011-15. Numbers are recorded as of March 31 each year.

The x-axis shows the years, starting in 2011 and going to 2015. It carries vertical bars that are two colours: blue on the top, representing the percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs that are men; and red on the bottom, representing the percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs that are women.

The y-axis shows the number of active Tier 2 Chairs, from zero to 1,200, in increments of 200.

The number and percentage of active Tier 2 Chairs, by gender and year, were reported as follows:

  • In 2011: 697 men (69 per cent), 318 women (31 per cent).
  • In 2012: 680 men (68 per cent), 327 women (32 per cent).
  • In 2013: 636 men (66 per cent), 327 women (34 per cent).
  • In 2014: 576 men (64 per cent), 327 women (36 per cent).
  • In 2015: 548 men (63 per cent), 325 women (37 per cent).

Equity Targets and Results of Participating Institutions

In the spirit of openness and transparency, the program is making public the results and findings of its target-setting exercise, while respecting the Privacy Act. Please select the designated group below to download the dataset in Excel format:

Women
Persons with disabilities
Aboriginal Peoples
Members of visible minorities

Understanding the Datasets

The information in these tables reflects the number of individuals who self-identified as members of the designated groups. Since self-identification is voluntary, this may not include all chairholders belonging to a group. This is important to consider when interpreting the data, given that low self-identification rates may affect the results. 

In 2009, universities of all sizes completed a baseline target-setting exercise, where they set their first equity targets and measured the gap between occupied Chairs and these targets.

Starting in 2012, every year, all universities of one size (small, medium or large) report on their progress towards meeting their previous equity targets and set new ones. This creates a three-year cycle for collecting all of the data. For example, in the 2012-14 target-setting cycle, institutions reported and set targets as follows: medium in 2012, large in 2013 and small in 2014.

Each year, the program categorizes participating institutions by size, which is defined as follows:

    • Large: 40 Chair allocations and more
    • Medium: 11 to 39 Chair allocations
    • Small : 10 Chairs or less

Learn more about the program’s allocation method.

In addition, due to limits in available statistical data, the targets for three of the four groups (persons with disabilities, Aboriginal Peoples and members of visible minorities) are set using approximations of the pools of potential nominees. Learn more about the program’s target-setting method.

In keeping with the Privacy Act, if the number of chairholders who self-identified as belonging to one of the four groups is less than five, it is not provided to protect the privacy of chairholders. For this same reason, the data is not presented by tier or agency.

Data by Institution Size

The tables below represent the data collected from the target-setting exercises completed in 2009 to 2016 by institution size.

Table 1: Representation of Four Designated Groups among Canada Research Chairs in 2009 by University Size
  Number of universities Number of Chairs Women Visible minorities Persons with a disability Aboriginal Peoples

Equity Target

 

 

25%

11%

5%

0.7%

Large

15

1,341

24%

12%

1%

0%

Medium

17

371

24%

12%

1%

1%

Small

33

161

27%

9%

0%

2%

Total

65

1,873

24%

12%

1%

0.4%

Source: This information comes from the target-setting exercise completed by institutions in 2009, and represents almost all Chairs allocated to universities at the time of reporting.


Table 2: Representation of Four Designated Groups among Canada Research Chairs in 2012-14 by University Size
  Number of universities Number of Chairs Women Visible minorities Persons with a disability Aboriginal Peoples

Equity Target

 

 

28%

15%

4%

1%

Large

15

1,270

25%

13%

2%

1%

Medium

16

340

25%

15%

1%

1%

Small

39

200

35%

9%

1%

2%

Total

70

1,810

26%

13%

2%

1%

Source: The information comes from the target-setting exercises completed by institutions in 2012 (medium), 2013 (large) and 2014 (small). It represents almost all Chairs allocated to the universities (medium and large) or occupied Chairs (small) at the time of reporting.


Table 3: Representation of Four Designated Groups among Canada Research Chairs in 2015-17 by University Size
  Number of universities Number of Chairs Women Visible minorities Persons with a disability Aboriginal Peoples

Equity Target

 

 

31%

15%

4%

1%

Large

15

1,261

28%

15%

1%

1%

Medium

17

314

26%

16%

1%

1%

Small

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grand Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

Source: This information comes from the target-setting exercises completed by institutions for 2015 (medium) and 2016 (large), and represents the number of occupied Chairs at the time of reporting.

Visit the Equity Practices page for more information on the program’s commitment to ensuring access to opportunities for all qualified candidates.